Peer support: Shared experience in suicide prevention

Peer support specialists — those individuals with lived experience of mental illness and/or substance use disorder (SUD) — have been well-established in behavioral health interventions.

Their shared experience provides the credibility and understanding that help individuals with mental health and SUD challenges on their road to recovery.

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Surviving suicide: The power of storytelling

When professionals interested in suicide prevention discuss suicide, a lot of data gets tossed around.

The suicide rate in the United States increased by 35 percent from 1999 to 2018. It is the 10th leading cause of death. Approximately 48,000 Americans die by suicide each year. However, there is one statistic that rarely sees the light of day.

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Taking a second look at suicide during COVID-19: An interview with the AAS

Recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that one in four Americans aged 18 to 24 had thoughts of suicide in the prior 30 days has mental health stakeholders reeling: How could the numbers be that high, even during a pandemic?

That question led Beacon Health Options to interview additional experts on suicide prevention.

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The unspoken crisis: Rising suicide rates among Black youth

It is already an alarming statistic that suicide is the 10th leading cause of death among Americans, and it’s only getting worse.

From 1999 to 2018, the suicide rate has increased by 35 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Yin and yang: Your introvert’s and extrovert’s happy return to school

The COVID-19 pandemic has taught you a lot about resilience as you work from home, while also managing your children, and possibly even educating them.

Consequently, you’ve learned a lot about yourself and your family. However, there may be one revelation that took you by surprise.

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Yes you can: How to manage the very difficult

For those people who are both working and parenting from home, the COVID-19 pandemic has turned into the perfect storm.

Even during “normal” times, simultaneously being a spouse, parent and employee can feel difficult, and many may feel that they aren’t fulfilling those roles 100 percent.

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Take action to reduce ‘self-stigma’

When it comes to behavioral health care, the term “stigma” is often used to describe the shame or embarrassment some people feel about mental illness.

Therefore, addressing stigma is important because the very concept of shame makes it difficult for many individuals with mental illness to seek help.

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Health and wellness: Is zip code more important than genetic code?

The evidence exceeds the tipping point – that point where compelling ideas by necessity transform into action.

The evidence? Unmet social needs significantly impact our health, especially our emotional well-being. In fact, it is often said that zip code is more important than genetic code in determining overall health and wellness.

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Minority mental health: What can we do together?

Recognizing July as Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, there is no more appropriate time to talk about mental health disparities among minorities.

People of color continue to experience inequitable mental health care, and the solution to closing the gap is long overdue.

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Cultural competency can help improve health equity

When we think of a visit to the doctor or a mental health specialist, a common experience emerges.

In the case of the doctor, questions are asked, knees are tapped, hearts are listened to, and height and weight are measured. With a mental health clinician, questions are asked, questions are answered, and a meaningful conversation ensues.

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