Stigma

Dorms, dining halls and depression: College students at risk

The awareness of depression as a human condition is not modern or new.

The earliest written accounts of the condition emerged from the second millennium BC in Mesopotamia when it was seen as more spiritual than physical.

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Beacon Health Options offers questions to ask and answer during Mental Health Awareness Month

In any given year, an astonishing 1 in 5 Americans will face mental illness. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the U.S., with more than 40 million lives affected. Additionally, about 16 million have major depression. But despite the prevalence of mental health conditions, only about a third of Americans seek treatment. Just as other illnesses – such as high blood pressure or diabetes – are treatable and manageable, so too are mental health issues. That’s why May has been designated as Mental Health Awareness Month, an observance developed to raise awareness of mental health issues and the stigma attached to them. At Beacon Health Options, our entire focus is on mental and behavioral health, because that’s…

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July: It’s more than an observance of mental health awareness

Despite advances in health equity, disparities in mental health care persist. Recognizing July as National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, the Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health (OMH) acknowledges this disparity by joining partners at the federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial levels to help raise awareness about mental illness and its effects on racial and ethnic minority populations.

The OMH quotes the following statistics from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration regarding mental health disparities among minority populations.

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NAMI Conference 2018: Helping people make connections

I came to my first NAMI conference as a person in recovery from bipolar disorder and as a mental health journalist.

The NAMI 2018 conference in New Orleans last month proved wildly successful in connecting me with like-minded souls as well as to businesses and organizations that can help people like me live complete and meaningful lives

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The Many Faces of Stigma

The theme “Live. Learn. Share Hope” of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) National Convention to be held June 27-30 in New Orleans provides an excellent launching pad to start a conversation regarding stigma as we live, learn and share hope about the people affected by mental illness.

Stigma, like so many of life’s experiences, can be as individual as the person experiencing it.

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Mental Illness and Violence – Challenges and Solutions

Are people with serious mental illness more prone to violence than the general population? In the aftermath of almost weekly mass shootings and other acts of extreme violence, this question inevitably emerges.

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The Kennedy Forum Illinois: Mental health justice

The individual voice of mental illness took a stand at the fourth annual Kennedy Forum Illinois, held in Chicago on January 16 and 17, as high-profile speakers shared deeply personal stories related to their mental health struggles.

A leading forum participant, Beacon Health Options (Beacon) joined these speakers in their quest to eradicate stigma.

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Half the battle: My story of bipolar disorder in an already sober world

April 2011. It’s late afternoon, and my second day of the Partial Program at Beverly Hospital has wrapped up.

I’m plowing down Route 128 with a song on the radio that I don’t remember. Everything has changed, but I’m not totally sure if that’s a good or bad thing.

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Beacon’s ‘Triple Aim’: Camaraderie, advocacy, health

The Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s (IHI) “Triple Aim” has become a household term for many in health care.

The phrase refers to improving the American health care system through a three-pronged framework: improve the patient care experience, improve populations’ health, and reduce the per capita cost of health care.

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And the diagnosis is . . .

It’s first grade and the assignment is to draw Three Blind Mice.

All the kids around me had cute pictures it seemed, but mine was a big blob, looking as though someone had thrown up. This is my first memory of feeling behind in school.

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