Behavioral Health

Beacon’s ‘coach approach’ earns accolades

Peer specialists and recovery coaches have long been part of Beacon Health Options’ solutions for members.

For many years, they have helped Beacon members to reach their recovery and wellness goals through one-on-one coaching, advocacy and guidance.

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Know the signs: Help prevent a loved one’s suicide

Anna was one of the most talented and creative people I had ever known, and just about everyone who met her felt the same.

Anna was sadly successful, as she was in everything, in ending her life. . . .Unfortunately, the story of a Beacon Health Options employee’s friend is not unique or unfamiliar to many people. Often, the friends and families of people at risk for suicidal behavior disorder have no idea of that risk.

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Confronting an opioid crisis: Beacon funding supports local efforts

Beacon Health Options (Beacon) believes that excellent health care is local health care.

Standing by that belief, Beacon is distributing $128,000 in grants to four community-based behavioral health organizations that are combatting the opioid crisis in Massachusetts at the grassroots level.

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Retail therapy: The best health care is local

With one in five Americans suffering from a mental illness at any point in their lives, the demand for behavioral health services is loud and clear, but the reality is that many people do not have access to quality care.

Indeed, only 26 percent of the need for mental health services is met in this country, according to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services.

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One of the toughest endeavors: Changing health behavior

Beacon Health Options’ mission is to help people live their lives to the fullest potential. It’s a simple, yet extraordinarily complicated, goal because it requires changing behavior at all levels – system, provider and individual.

Beacon has myriad programs to help improve individuals’ mental health, and ultimately, wellbeing. Programs range from pharmacy management to home-based therapy to opioid use disorder (OUD) treatment to intensive case management.

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Remembering Daniel: A story told is a story never forgotten

He was one of the most honest people I had ever met. His face was honest; it betrayed every emotion. His voice was honest. He always told you exactly what he was thinking. His heart was honest.

He felt things more strongly than anyone I know. I loved him. I met him on the first day of 9th grade and was instantly smitten. He was always kind and jovial with me, despite my relatively uncool standing, to his relatively popular one.

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Measurement-based care leads to improved outcomes, resource efficiency

There’s a lot of discussion in health care circles about evidence-based care, measurement-based care, best-practice care, holistic care.

The terms don’t stop there, and neither does their singular importance. Each term has its own significance in this larger puzzle of health care terminology.

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Teach your children well

The youngest of three, Casey did her own thing, her own way. Popular, athletic and prom-queen pretty, she is quick-witted and outgoing, with a sarcastic sense of humor.

When it was time to go to college, we weren’t concerned about her becoming a “girls-gone-wild” casualty because of her focus on academics and general self-assurance.

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Beacon’s ‘Triple Aim’: Camaraderie, advocacy, health

The Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s (IHI) “Triple Aim” has become a household term for many in health care.

The phrase refers to improving the American health care system through a three-pronged framework: improve the patient care experience, improve populations’ health, and reduce the per capita cost of health care.

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‘Did you hear about Frank?’

As I showed a hometown friend around my university’s library one November Sunday afternoon in my sophomore year, a classmate saw me and said, “Did you hear about Frank?”.

I had last seen my roommate on Friday afternoon when we both headed to our respective hometowns for the weekend. I returned to the campus on Sunday. Frank did not. He had died by suicide.

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